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Sony a7R Mark II: Part One (The Camera)

Posted on Monday, March 7th, 2016

Dave!Ever since I received a Canon A-1 SLR camera as a graduation present, photography has been the hobby that will not die. Other activities come and go, but this is the one that's always there regardless of circumstances. The artistry that comes into play when composing a shot is every bit a creative endeavor for me as painting a picture or shaping something from clay or pushing pixels on a computer. And the more I move away from "automatic" camera settings and start making my own choices as to how an image will be recorded, the more I'm left craving a better tool set.

Not to say that I don't already have a pretty stunning array of tools in my photo bag. When I prepped for my Africa trip, I sunk a huge chunk of cash into some impressive hardware and went home with some pretty amazing shots to show for it.

But, as with most hobbies, even "amazing" is never enough.

Ever since Sony unleashed the NEX-6, which took every advantage of mirrorless camera technology to deliver stunning DSLR quality in a portable package that was perfect for travel, my allegiance to Sony gear was set. So much so that I took an even deeper plunge when I bought the Sony a7S because of its full-frame sensor and a miraculous ability to shoot in low-light situations. And then I dropped a chunk of my savings on the Sony FE 70-200 zoom lens, which gave me an entirely new appreciation for an aspect of photography I rarely explored.

And yet... as much as I love my NEX-6 and a7S, I'm starting to hit boundaries of where I can go with them.

Time to take a look at Sony's second generation of a7's. Starting with the a7 Mark II, which I was all set to buy when it was released a year ago. It's a big step up from my NEX-6, and has a lot of room to grow. Except... I didn't have any big photo opportunities coming up, so I decided to wait for the inevitable release of the more feature-packed variant, the a7R Mark II. Which finally happened back in August. I wanted one immediately, of course, but the price tag was double what I had saved up for the a7ii, so I'd have to wait until I had the means to do it. In other words, I had to wait for my tax refund to happen.

It did, and now I have my dream camera...

Sony a7R Mark II

The a7R Mark II has a dizzying array of "professional" features for me to salivate over, mostly justifying the stupefying $3,200.00 price tag. Primary of which is the new sensor, a full-frame marvel that has amazing 42MP resolution. Though, to be honest it's not the whopper pixel-count that made me buy into the hardware (more pixels don't necessarily translate into great photos, and you have to have a subject and lenses that will make it worthwhile). No, what I was obsessed with in the sensor specs was the BSI (backside-illuminated) CMOS construction, which allows for more light to reach the sensor and provide much better ISO performance. Which means less noise and more detail in less light. Not to the level of my Sony a7S (which only has 12MP), but jaw-dropping performance just the same. In other words, The Camera Holy Grail.

But that's just marketing hype. Does Sony deliver?

Well, obviously they did, or I wouldn't have bought the camera.

I read many, many reviews before my tax refund came in, and it really does seem like the camera that's too good to be true... for me and what I do anyway.

And how did that pan out?

I'll get into that with Part 2 tomorrow.

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Categories: Photography 2016Click To It: Permalink
   

Comments

  1. martymankins says:

    Part II… can’t wait to read more. I didn’t realize that Sony made a camera that cost more than the Canon 5D Mark III.

  2. Dad says:

    David, I have used Zeiss lens on my Hasselblad cameras for years. Even though my cameras and lens are over twenty years old they still perform with the greatest detail. With my new digital back for the Hasselblad it is amazing. I am thrilled that you have the new camera and the best lens made. I can not wait to see your photographs.

  3. Drools. Very very nice. One of these years I’ll upgrade my old Canon. Can’t wait to read more about your Sony.

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